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All Posts By

Oskar Boström

Vintage Illuminated Watches, Clocks and Dials Emitting Radon

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In the beginning of the 20th century, scientists developed a way to mix “radium 226” with paint. This created ‘radioluminescent paint’. This breakthrough led to the new product being applied to clocks and telephones. Even airplane instrumentation panels (all now considered to be vintage), enabling the devices to glow in the dark.

However the new approach led to unforeseen circumstances. By 1925 a group of radium painters, later referred to as the Radium Girls, sued their employer over health issues. This was believed to be stemming from the ingestion of radium through a practice called ‘pointing’ their brushes. They would lick the ends of the brushes to refine the bristles into a point. Subsequently ingesting radium remnants from the brush. As a result, by 1930 ‘pointing’ brushes was no longer done by mouth and there were no more incidences of malignancy due to radium. This led most people to believe that radium was not a health risk provided you did not consume it.

Sixty years later researchers from the University of Northampton wondered whether since radium decays into radon gas, “vintage” clocks, watches, phones and such items, previously coated in radium paint could influence radon gas levels as the radium naturally decays.

The study was performed in a small bedroom and consisted of measuring the radon gas level for a baseline. Then adding 30 radium dial watches to the room to see how much the radon level would change, if at all. Upon retesting it was discovered that the room’s radon level rose to 134 times the level at which the EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) recommends action.

The data from this first study of its kind indicates a previously unconsidered risk. This was from owning, collecting, and storing radium dial watches or other items coated in radium-infused paint.

So keep calm, and think before you go vintage.

Read the Original Article Here
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Acquisition of Gammadata provides Radonova with a Complete Program for Radon Measurement

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By acquiring the radon measurement instrument division of Gammadata Instruments, Radonova Laboratories has further strengthened its position as a world leader in home and workplace radon measurement. Through the acquisition, Radonova has added several advanced instruments and products to its portfolio. Broadening its range of radon measurement technologies.

By offering a comprehensive program for radon measurement, Radonova is responding to the global demand for safe and efficient radon measurements in homes and workplaces.

“With this acquisition, we get access to leading edge products which are at the absolute forefront of research and development. For example, ATMOS, the world’s most sensitive radon sniffer. We now have an expanded portfolio of instruments and products. We are in a position where we can offer new and existing customers an optimal radon measurement program. Particularly in the rapidly growing European market of workplace radon measurement,” says Radonova Laboratories CEO Karl Nilsson. One of Gammadata’s founders, Dag Sedin, has 30 years of experience in instrument development for radiation measurement. He will take on the role of consultant at Radonova Laboratories. Dag comments on the acquisition:

“As we are now part of Radonova Laboratories, there is enormous potential for intensifying our research to ensure that we continue to deliver the most innovative radon instruments and sensors available on the market. Radonova provides us with a great platform to further develop the new product lines we have in the pipeline. The first of these will be an update to the ATMOS radon sniffer. In addition, Radonova has an established export network that will provide numerous new opportunities for growth when new products are released.”

For more information on radon and radon measurement visit www.radonova.co.uk

For more information, please contact Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories AB Phone: +46 (0)70-639 01 31, E-mail: karl.nilsson@radonova.com

Acquisition

The world’s most sensitive radon sniffer ATMOS is now becoming part of Radonova’s extensive program for radon measurements.

Radon Entry Points – Basement

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Many homes have basement areas. Whether finished or not there is always a potential for radon to enter your home through the basement. Not all homes will have every radon entry point shown, but the image shows the most common ones. Any one of these entry points could contribute to a high radon gas level in the home.

Testing for radon is the only  way to know if your home has high levels of dangerous radon gas, a class A carcinogen that causes lung cancer.

Test Your Home Today!

Radon can be a health risk in ordinary workplaces

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Workplace radon is a so-called “inert” gas that emits ionising radiation, which means that radon is radioactive. Therefore it is also a potent risk. Ionising radiation can cause damage to cells, which in turn leads to illnesses such as cancer. Lung cancer is the most common form of cancer that can be caused by radon.
Radon gas is an element that can come directly from the ground because radon is created when uranium decays. It therefore exists naturally, which can affect properties that have basements with poor insulation. Or that are otherwise in direct contact with the ground.

How do you know if radon is a health risk in the workplace?

It is easy to measure radon levels in the workplace to see whether the value exceeds the limit above which radon is estimated to be a health risk. If the radon level is above 400 Bq/m³, it could mean that spending too much time in the property entails a direct health risk.

Measuring radon levels is simple and straightforward using radon boxes placed in rooms in which people spend the most time. In the case of homes, they are normally placed in bedrooms and living rooms. In the case of a workplace, it is a question of finding similar places in which people spend a lot of time.

There are two different kinds of radon boxes available: those offering long-term measurement or those offering short-term measurement. Long-term measurement must be carried out during the winter months and needs to last for two to three months to provide the most complete results possible for radon levels in the property. A so-called “annual average value” for the radon levels can be obtained from long-term measurement. There are also boxes that are used to carry out short-term measurements. A measurement with these boxes only takes around 10 twenty-four hour periods. Short-term boxes can be used at any time of year. Nevertheless, the results they give are not as accurate as long-term measurements.

What do you do about high radon levels?

There are a couple of different ways of dealing with high radon levels. One of the most common ways is to simply increase the ventilation to reduce the concentration of radon in the air.

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Guide to radon monitoring in the workplace

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Under the EU Radiation Protection Directive, 2013/59/Euratom, which entered into force in February 2018, employers must determine the radon concentrations in the workplace and take appropriate measures to address radon levels above the national limit for radon. With the introduction of the new Directive, questions often arise as to how radon monitoring in the workplace should be handled.

How do we measure radon in workplaces and what should we be considering?

It is basically easy to measure radon. You order radon detectors, deploy them, record data, collect the detectors and send them to the radon laboratory, which will return a report by e-mail or online. However, there are several aspects to consider, such as how many radon detectors are needed for a reliable measurement. Another question is how the work can be done as efficiently as possible. As the biggest cost of radon measurement is the time it takes to deploy the detectors, record the data, and then retrieve them again, it is vital to ensure efficiency and safety at all stages of the process.

Requirements for radon monitoring in a workplace

To make efficient use of time and arrive at a correct measurement, the person monitoring a workplace should make the following demands of the laboratory where the radon detectors were bought. This applies whether you do the job yourself or use an external consultant. Measurements should be taken with radon detectors from an accredited radon laboratory.

Ensure that:

– the laboratory is accredited according to ISO 17025 for measuring radon in indoor air
– the delivery time for detectors is within 2-3 days of ordering
– the delivery time for electronic analysis reports is within one (1) week of the detectors reaching the laboratory
– the laboratory has a web application which allows measurement details to be entered and results to be downloaded, and

  • measurements to be filtered on e.g. address, property name, order code etc.
  • consolidated reports to be downloaded in PDF format
  • can be used on a tablet or other mobile device in the field.

It is also important to make the radon measurements known to your own staff. Information material on radon and the planned measurements should therefore be distributed before monitoring starts. It is also important to inform the cleaning staff if the service is outsourced. The radon detectors need to be placed securely so they cannot be moved or otherwise interfered with during monitoring (cable ties could be used).

How many radon detectors are needed to monitor radon in the workplace?

For radon measurement in the workplace, Radonova recommends following guidelines from IRMA (the International Radon Measurement Association). You will then meet your national requirements as well. The advantage of IRMA’s guidelines is that their recommended measurement procedure helps to save time.

The following locations must be included when measuring radon:

– Rooms and locations regularly used for more than four hours per day
– All underground/basement locations or other locations used by anyone for more than 50 hours per year where there is a risk of radon leakage
– Any relevant locations/rooms at basement and ground floor level. In larger spaces, deploy at least one detector per 150 m2.
– On higher floors: At least two detectors, and at least one per 250 m2.

What happens if you are over the reference value?

If it turns out that you are over the reference value, you should start by measuring the radon concentration during working hours (a shorter period). You could do this with Radonova’s Duotrak radon detector, for example. Note: Because work premises are usually ventilated more during working hours, the radon level could be lower at this time.

If the workplace is still over the reference value, you must take steps to reduce the radon level. This is normally done by controlling the ventilation. In these cases, however, we recommend contacting a radon consultant who can investigate where the radon is coming from and suggest appropriate action.

Radonova launches brand-new vacuum packs for radon detectors

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Radonova are launching a new vacuum packaging solution.

The new packaging enables us to vacuum seal radon detectors during transit which helps us to improve quality even further. This ensures safe transit and analysis can be done without radon leakages. The packaging technique will help prevent damaging effects from external factors on the measurement results.

With radon monitoring it is crucial to be able to seal the detectors to ensure the test results are reliable.

Vacuum packs enable more efficient transport and storage

“In addition to being completely radon-tight, the new vacuum pack is smaller. This means less bulky shipments and more efficient storage. This particularly benefits our distributors and international customers. Of course the new packaging also has environmental benefits as it uses less material. Another advantage with the new packaging technique is that bags damaged in transit can easily be spotted”, explains Radonova’s laboratory manager, Oscar Wännerud.

“We have always used very high quality plastic films but by using our new machine and a more automated process it means we are now taking a further step towards the optimum packaging solution” says Wännerud.

WHO estimates that up to 14% of all lung cancer cases are caused by radon. Find out more about the risks associated with radon and how to measure it here.

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