was successfully added to your cart.

Basket

All Posts By

Christine Bolster

Canadian radon project chooses Radonova for analysis of radon samples

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

Swedish Radonova Laboratories has been commissioned to analyse radon samples in the major Canadian campaign “Evict Radon”. This campaign aims to reduce the incidence of radon in Canadian homes and lung cancer as a consequence of long-term exposure to radon gas. This campaign being conducted in the province of Alberta is headed by Dr Aaron Goodarzi at the University of Calgary.

Radon is measured for at least 90 days and analysed at Radonova’s laboratory. The results will form the basis for continued studies on how radon exposure affects the environment and the health of residents. The project involves doctors, biologists, geologists, architects and experts from a number of other fields. It is estimated that in parts of the province of Alberta, one in six homes is affected by radon. Moreover, every day one resident is diagnosed with lung cancer caused by radon.

May become a template for similar projects

“We are naturally proud that such a large and important project has chosen Radonova as its partner for analysis of its radon measurements. At the same time, we know that Radonova is the only operator with global ISO certification. We currently occupy a very prominent position when it comes to radon measurement and analysis. In this role we always want to play an active part in the work of reducing unhealthy exposure to radon. The Evict Radon campaign seems particularly important, as it is comprehensive and well planned. This means in turn that after the campaign has ended it can act as a template for similar projects,” says Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories.

After smoking, radon is the most common cause of lung cancer. This makes radon a serious global health problem that every year leads to around 230,000 cases of lung cancer.

For further information about the Evict Radon campaign, visit Evict radon

For further information about radon and radon measurement, visit our FAQ

Evict radon

Radonova joins metroRADON

By | News | No Comments

Radonova becomes part of Europe’s largest radon project

Radonova Laboratories has joined metroRADON, Europe’s largest project studying radon issues and measuring equipment.

The members of metroRADON are the foremost national operators in Europe. Including both companies and various universities as well as research institutions.

As part of the interest group, Radonova will contribute its long experience of radon measurement with passive devices, i.e. various kinds of sensors and radon detectors.

metroRADON

The interest group and project metroRADON stand for ‘Metrology for radon monitoring’. This radon project is funded by EMPIR (the European Metrology Programme for Innovation and Research).

“It is natural for Radonova to play an active part in this interest group. The issue of radon is largely addressed from a global perspective. The exchange of experience and research has a major bearing on each country’s ability to reduce the harmful effects of radon on health,” says Radonova Laboratories’ CEO Karl Nilsson.

“Radonova has been to several meetings of metroRADON during the year and now becomes an active and effective member of the consortium. We intend to contribute valuable knowledge in the field of radon monitoring while taking a closer look at the research and experience from other countries,” says Radonova Laboratories’ radon specialist José-Luis Gutiérrez Villanueva.

For more information on the project, visit www.metroradon.eu.

You can read more about radon and the associated risks here. We have also put together a page of questions and answers on radon monitoring. You can find it here.

COIRA chooses radon detectors from Radonova for major international study

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

Radonova Laboratories will be providing radon detectors to a major international study to be run by COIRA (the Coalition of International Radon Associations). The aim of the project is to compare radon measurement results obtained by the world’s leading monitoring institutions in the field of radiation protection. The project started in August 2018 and will run for two years.

“This is a very important project. It will help us towards a more consistent way of working and greater precision in our work on radon measurements. COIRA provides a forum for the collective global expertise on radon. We are pleased to be an active part of this forum in terms of both measuring equipment and knowledge,” says Karl Nilsson, a member of the board of COIRA and CEO of Radonova Laboratories.
coira

Radonova’s radon specialist José-Luis Gutiérrez Villanueva is a member of the project committee. He is there as an expert and representative of ERA (the European Radon Association), one of the project’s scientific coordinators (COIRA). Gutiérrez Villanueva is also involved in the work of analysing the data collected.

“Such a comprehensive comparative study means that we can expect to have access to reference tools within a few years.  This will make radon monitoring safer and more effective,” he explains.

COIRA was formed in 2015 and has five member associations: ERA (the European Radon Association), AARST (the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists), CARST (the Canadian Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists), UKRA (the UK Radon Association) and NGRA (the Nordic Group of Radon Associations).

For more information on the project, visit www.coiraradon.com.

You can read more about radon and the associated risks here. We have also put together a page of questions and answers on radon monitoring. You can find it here.

House – Why does radon exist in homes and where does radon come from?

By | Home | No Comments

When you own a house or intend to buy a house, you often hear talk about radon values and the fact that you need to check them for health reasons. But where does radon come from?

Radon is a gas that occurs naturally in soil and in bedrock. It is a so-called “inert” gas and is an element with the chemical symbol Rn and atomic number 86 in the periodic table. The property that makes radon damaging to health is the fact that it is a radioactive substance. Radioactivity means that radon emits radiation, so-called “ionising” radiation which affects biological systems. The element radon is part of the decay chain, which includes the elements uranium and radium (which are also radioactive).
Ionising radiation can damage cells and cause cell death and can destroy DNA molecules in the body. Which can lead to mutations and therefore to cancer. Lung cancer in particular is a form of cancer that can be caused by radon radiation.

Where does radon in a house come from?

Radon originally comes from uranium and radium, which occur naturally in bedrock. If a building is constructed on such land, and particularly if the building also has a basement, there can be a problem with radon. The parts of the building that come into contact with the ground can let in radon from the surroundings if they are not sealed.

Investigation and measurement

It is easy to measure and investigate radon in a home. A radon laboratory will help by sending out measurement boxes for radon. You simply hang these from the ceiling in the rooms you want to measure radon in. The measurement must go on for a few months. Then the radon boxes are sent in to the laboratory for analysis and you get a radon value for each room. The limit value for radon is currently 300 Bq/m3 in dwellings. If it is higher than that, you should carry out some form of radon degasification.

house

Radonova makes first delivery of radon detectors to Africa

By | News | No Comments

Radonova’s first project on the African continent.

Swedish Radonova Laboratories has received an order from the IAEA for radon detectors to monitor radon in Cameroon.

The contract is not only for the delivery of detectors, but also for the analysis of radon samples.

As a result, Radonova is delivering materials and services for use on the African continent for the first time.

Radonova

“This order shows that radon is a global health problem. There’s a growing awareness of this issue in countries that haven’t paid that much attention to this in the past. The IAEA may not be a government authority, but it still has great influence and stringent demands when it comes to quality, reliability and support. We also know that we won this contract in competition with several other players and the IAEA chose us as the best option,” says Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories.

“Only a few months ago we signed our first co-operation agreement in Asia. Naturally, it’s a pleasure to continue our international expansion into another continent. Regardless of the environment being tested, radon monitoring and analysis must always be carried out safely and reliably,” Nilsson concludes.

For further information on radon and radon monitoring, visit www.radonova.co.uk
IAEA stands for the International Atomic Energy Agency. For further information, visit www.iaea.org

Important to measure radon regardless of where you live

By | Home, Multi occupancy building | No Comments

In the UK, there are radon maps that show which areas are more exposed to radon and which are less exposed. Consequently, many people do not measure radon because they think they live in a radon-free area, but that is wrong. Almost all of UK is exposed to radon and considerable local differences can exist within the residential areas. That is confirmed by studies carried out by Radonova in which the results from the same residential area were examined. That is why it is always important to measure radon and not rely on radon maps.

Why are there such large local differences in radon content?

It is due to variations in radon in the ground and how buildings are constructed. Also what maintenance they have had and what rebuilding has taken place.

The levels of radon in the ground depend on factors such as the extent to which the elements uranium and radium are present in our rock types and therefore also our soil types. Radon gas is formed from these elements and is transported through the soil layer with the aid of air and ground water. This means, for example, that there is a greater risk of radon in buildings constructed on sand and gravel. These highly porous soil types contain large amounts of air that can easily transport radon up into buildings.

Important – Where does radon leak into houses?

Radon from the ground leaks into houses and apartment blocks in many different ways. Unsealed penetrations in the form of incoming electricity and water supplies enable radon to leak into the building. A concrete pad with cracks can also allow radon to leak in.

These causes mean that there can be considerable local variations in the radon content in residential areas. It is therefore always important to measure the radon content in indoor air, regardless of where you live and how you live – in a house or in an apartment building.

important

Radonova uses date-marking for even safer measurement

By | Measurement, News | No Comments
date-marking

Radonova Laboratories introduces date-marking for the detectors used in radon monitoring. Together with the recently launched vacuum packaging, the date-mark ensures that the monitoring and analysis work can be carried out with the utmost reliability.

Tryggve Rönnqvist, technical manager at Radonova Laboratories, describes the benefits of date-marking the detectors:

“By date-marking each individual pack, we further increase the measurement certainty of short-term monitoring. If radon monitoring is carried out over seven to ten days after the detector has been stored for a year, this could have some effect on the result. Quite simply, it’s more difficult to measure lower concentrations reliably if the monitoring period is short and the storage time is long. Even though we’re talking about small deviations, we always strive to give our customers the most accurate monitoring results possible.”

Easier for stockists and customers with their own stock of detectors

“Above all, data-marketing makes life easier for international stockists and customers who have their own stock of radon detectors. Now they can quickly see how old the detectors are and optimise their warehouse logistics accordingly. Real estate agents are another good example of businesses that benefit from clear date-marking. Monitoring is often fast and frequent in this segment and many agents, therefore, often have their own supply of detectors. With date-marking, we’ve made it easier to use the detectors in the right order.

“Although our monitoring is already at the very forefront of reliability, clear data-marking of each detector and the newly introduced vacuum packaging helps us to offer even simpler, more reliable radon monitoring.

Radonova Laboratories is introducing date-marking on its detectors in November 2018. The newly launched vacuum packaging provides a maximum storage time of eight months. Both for short-term monitoring and three years for long-term monitoring. Radonova also recommends beginning long-term monitoring within 18 months because the measurement uncertainty decreases the sooner monitoring begins.

For further information about radon and radon monitoring, contact us here

Measuring radon in water – Radonova gets top marks in EU test

By | Okategoriserade | No Comments

Radonova Laboratories has achieved excellent results in the comparative EU test “REM 2018”. The test measures the incidence of radon in water and compares participating laboratories’ analytical results with a reference value. Radonova’s analysis had an average deviation of 3.8 per cent in relation to the reference value. Deviations up to 15 per cent are judged to be an acceptable result.

“This is a large-scale international test that demonstrates that Radonova’s method of measuring radon in drinking water is reliable and very precise. Radon in water does not necessarily present a major problem. However, radon that evaporates into indoor air when, for example, we take a shower, wash up or do laundry, can be a health hazard. For this reason it is important for studies and tests of this kind to be conducted,” comments Tryggve Rönnqvist, technical manager at Radonova Laboratories.

The comparative test covers a total of 101 participating laboratories, some of which have been involved in more than one analysis. The full name of the test is “REM 2018 radon-in-water proficiency test”.

About radon gas in water

Radon in water easily evaporates into the air. This in turn can contribute to raised radon levels in the indoor air. This also leads to an increased risk of lung cancer. Radon levels of 1,000 Bq/l can add roughly another 100 Bq/m³ to the indoor air. It is primarily radon gas in drinking water from drilled wells that must be measured. In order to ensure that the water does not contain dangerous levels of radon.

For further information about radon in water, visit Radonova laboratories

water

Johan Olsson leads Radonova’s work to measure radon in workplaces

By | Workplace | No Comments
workplaces

“It’s time the new Radiation Protection Act for workplaces was taken seriously”

Sweden’s new Radiation Protection Act came into force on 1 June 2018. Now the country’s employers have to be aware of the radon levels in our workplaces. Employers also have to take action that may reasonably be required to tackle radon levels over the hygienic limit value of 200 Bq/m³.

Johan Olsson of Radonova Laboratories is a specialist in workplace monitoring. He describes his view of efforts to monitor radon in the workplace.

What are your impressions since the law came in?

Unfortunately, knowledge of radon is generally low. I’d also say that a great many of Sweden’s employers are unaware what the new law means. Essentially, it’s about a health issue and about employees not being exposed to radon levels above the hygienic limit value. After almost half a year, you might think it’s time to take the law seriously.

Another observation is that when companies contact us and we describe how radon is monitored, the response is often, “That’s simple, we should have done this earlier.”

Monitoring radon properly from the offset gives both the employer and employees the peace of mind of knowing what the radon levels are at work. If you carry out proper monitoring and it turns out that the limit value is being exceeded, it’s simpler and less costly to take the right action.

How do we monitor radon in workplaces and what should we be considering?

Basically, it’s easy to monitor radon. You order radon detectors, deploy them, record data, collect the detectors and send them to the radon laboratory, which will return a report by e-mail or online. However, there are several aspects to consider, such as how many radon detectors are needed for reliable monitoring? Another question is how can the work be done as efficiently as possible? The biggest cost of radon monitoring is the time it takes to deploy the detectors, record the data and then retrieve them again. This is vital for ensuring efficiency and safety in all stages of the process.

Real estate companies that carry out monitoring in, say, shopping malls, are one example of an efficient approach. It’s an added value for the tenants if radon monitoring takes place in each store without the tenants having to carry out their own monitoring. If the real estate company carries out the monitoring with, say Radonova, they have full control and avoid a situation arising later on where individual premises have elevated radon levels.

How many radon detectors are needed to monitor radon in the workplace?

For radon monitoring in the workplace, we recommend following the guidelines from IRMA (the International Radon Measurement Association). You will then meet your national requirements as well. The advantage of IRMA’s guidelines is that their recommended measurement procedure helps to save time.

Are there any common misconceptions about monitoring in the workplace?

One common misconception is that it’s sufficient to carry out monitoring in one in every five rooms or use one detector per 500 m³ in large premises. The information can be found in the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority’s method descriptio. But it also says that monitoring should be carried out where there are suspected high radon levels. Also in rooms that have or are adjacent to pipework, which can increase the risk of high radon levels. In principle, this means that monitoring should take place in all rooms where employees spend more than four hours a week.

Radonova is a world leader in radon monitoring. Describe why you’ll be a leader in this market, too…

We offer safe, accredited monitoring methods and our products can be used in public environments. We also offer the fastest delivery and shortest analysis times on the market. Radonova has invested heavily in user-friendliness where companies that carry out radon monitoring simply record data about deployment and the monitoring dates. The results of the analysis are also easily accessible via our web application. All of the stages of our process are efficient and safe. Also the work and time taken to carry out monitoring is minimised.

 

Read more about radon monitoring in the workplace here»
https://radonova.co.uk/workplaces-and-premises/

For further information on radon monitoring in the workplace, please contact Johan Olsson, phone: +46 (0)18-56 88 00, e-mail: johan.olsson@radonova.com

How do you measure radon?

By | Home, Multi occupancy building | No Comments

Radon is a so-called “inert” gas that is also radioactive. It emits ionising radiation. If people suffer excessive exposure to this radiation in their workplace or at home, it can lead to cell damage and therefore to cancer. Radon is responsible for up to 14% of all cases of lung cancer in the world. So measurements are crucial.

Radon comes from the ground

Radon occurs naturally in the ground since it comes from uranium that decays. Buildings that have basements and that are otherwise in direct contact with the ground are most affected by radon.

You use detectors to measure radon

Radon is normally measured using what is referred to as “radon detectors”. These are small plastics inside holders that you place around the home or in the workplace for a certain period of time. This is to see the specific radon value in the specific rooms where the measurement is being carried out.

This means that it is best to place radon detectors in rooms where you spend a lot of time such as bedrooms and living rooms. In rooms in which you or the people around you spend the most time, it may be worth placing two detectors in different parts of the room to obtain the most accurate measurement possible.

Short or long-term measurements

There are two different types of detectors that you can use for radon measurement. The first of these is the detector that carries out a long-term measurement that most people are familiar with. A so-called “long-term measurement” enables you to obtain an average annual value for radon levels in indoor air. It is recommended to carry out long-term measurements during the winter months. This is because people do not ventilate as frequently as in summer, which concentrates the radon and, in turn, provides an optimum measurement. Long-term measurements take approximately two to three months and all you need to do is position the detectors. Then leave them there for the full period before sending them back.

For people who do not have the time required to carry out long-term measurements, there are also detectors that provide a quick measurement. These do not show the average amount of radon in a year, but can provide a quick indication of the property’s approximate exposure to radon. They are suitable for people who want to buy a house or another property. Quick measurements take up to 10 twenty-four hour periods and can be carried out at any time of year.

After the measurement

When the period of time for the selected detector has ended, you simply send them in. You then receive a full report on the results. This usually takes only one week to send out.

measurements