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January 2019

Why is radon dangerous?

By | Home, Multi occupancy building | No Comments
dangerous

Radon measurement is often carried out when buying houses and properties. But what is radon and why do you need to measure it and why is it dangerous?

Radon is dangerous

Radon is an element with atomic number 86 and chemical symbol Rn. It is a so-called “inert” gas, which means that the element radon does not readily react with other substances. However, radon gas is radioactive and decays naturally. When the radon decays, it emits ionising radiation containing alpha particles.

Ionising radiation

Ionisation removes electrons from an atom by means of radiation. Atoms, which were previously in equilibrium, then become charged ions which are able to react with other atoms or ions. Such reactions can damage and/or alter a DNA molecule and cause mutations or cancer or can kill cells. For that reason, ionising radiation, and therefore radon, is dangerous to humans.

Why are you exposed to radon in a building?

Radon in its normal form exists as a gas. You’d, therefore, presume that airing the building would get the radon out. You can fix some types of radon problem through simple ventilation, but this is not the best solution in many other cases. Unfortunately, the gas fills up constantly if the sourrrounding soil of the  building has a radon content that refills the indoor air.

Radon belongs to one of the natural decay chains, i.e. other radioactive substances decay and form new substances. Uranium and radium, two radioactive elements that exist in certain types of bedrock, are present earlier in this chain. In areas with high uranium levels or radium-rich ground, the risk of so-called “soil radon” will be higher. Radon is particularly common in buildings with basements because the walls are more exposed to the surrounding ground.

Long-term effects and radiation doses

Elevated radon levels in a building can cause an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung cancer. When you live and spend a lot of time in the building, radon can gradually cause harm.  Currently, the recommended radon level is less than 300 Bq m-3 in rooms in which you spend a lot of time (WHO recommends no more than 100 Bq m-3). If the value is higher, you should take action to deal with the radon problem.

Vintage Illuminated Watches, Clocks and Dials Emitting Radon

By | News | No Comments

In the beginning of the 20th century, scientists developed a way to mix “radium 226” with paint. This created ‘radioluminescent paint’. This breakthrough led to the new product being applied to clocks and telephones. Even airplane instrumentation panels (all now considered to be vintage), enabling the devices to glow in the dark.

However the new approach led to unforeseen circumstances. By 1925 a group of radium painters, later referred to as the Radium Girls, sued their employer over health issues. This was believed to be stemming from the ingestion of radium through a practice called ‘pointing’ their brushes. They would lick the ends of the brushes to refine the bristles into a point. Subsequently ingesting radium remnants from the brush. As a result, by 1930 ‘pointing’ brushes was no longer done by mouth and there were no more incidences of malignancy due to radium. This led most people to believe that radium was not a health risk provided you did not consume it.

Sixty years later researchers from the University of Northampton wondered whether since radium decays into radon gas, “vintage” clocks, watches, phones and such items, previously coated in radium paint could influence radon gas levels as the radium naturally decays.

The study was performed in a small bedroom and consisted of measuring the radon gas level for a baseline. Then adding 30 radium dial watches to the room to see how much the radon level would change, if at all. Upon retesting it was discovered that the room’s radon level rose to 134 times the level at which the EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) recommends action.

The data from this first study of its kind indicates a previously unconsidered risk. This was from owning, collecting, and storing radium dial watches or other items coated in radium-infused paint.

So keep calm, and think before you go vintage.

Read the Original Article Here
vintage

Acquisition of Gammadata provides Radonova with a Complete Program for Radon Measurement

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

By acquiring the radon measurement instrument division of Gammadata Instruments, Radonova Laboratories has further strengthened its position as a world leader in home and workplace radon measurement. Through the acquisition, Radonova has added several advanced instruments and products to its portfolio. Broadening its range of radon measurement technologies.

By offering a comprehensive program for radon measurement, Radonova is responding to the global demand for safe and efficient radon measurements in homes and workplaces.

“With this acquisition, we get access to leading edge products which are at the absolute forefront of research and development. For example, ATMOS, the world’s most sensitive radon sniffer. We now have an expanded portfolio of instruments and products. We are in a position where we can offer new and existing customers an optimal radon measurement program. Particularly in the rapidly growing European market of workplace radon measurement,” says Radonova Laboratories CEO Karl Nilsson. One of Gammadata’s founders, Dag Sedin, has 30 years of experience in instrument development for radiation measurement. He will take on the role of consultant at Radonova Laboratories. Dag comments on the acquisition:

“As we are now part of Radonova Laboratories, there is enormous potential for intensifying our research to ensure that we continue to deliver the most innovative radon instruments and sensors available on the market. Radonova provides us with a great platform to further develop the new product lines we have in the pipeline. The first of these will be an update to the ATMOS radon sniffer. In addition, Radonova has an established export network that will provide numerous new opportunities for growth when new products are released.”

For more information on radon and radon measurement visit www.radonova.co.uk

For more information, please contact Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories AB Phone: +46 (0)70-639 01 31, E-mail: karl.nilsson@radonova.com

Acquisition

The world’s most sensitive radon sniffer ATMOS is now becoming part of Radonova’s extensive program for radon measurements.